Reminder: PyCon proposal deadline now two weeks away


Remember to send in your proposals for PyCon 2005; the deadline for
submissions is December 31st, only two weeks away.

Read the call for proposals for more details:
http://www.python.org/pycon/2005/cfp.html

Proposal submission site:
http://submit.pycon.org

PyCon will also feature BoF sessions, sprints, lightning talks, and
open space for discussions. Please see the PyCon wiki at
http://www.python.org/moin/PyConDC2005 for more information, and to
record your ideas and plan your events.

--amk
Posted On: Monday 5th of November 2012 04:06:43 AM Total Views:  190
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RELATED TOPICS OF Python Programming PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE




PEP proposal optparse

I would like to know your thoughts on a proposed change to optparse that I have planned. It is possible to add default values to multiple options using the set_defaults. However, when adding descriptions to options the developer has to specify it in each add_option() call. This results in unreadable code such as: parser.add_option('-q', '--quiet' , action="store_false", dest='verbose', help = 'Output less information') parser.add_option('-o', '--output' , type='string', dest='castordir' , metavar='' , help = 'specify the wanted CASTOR directory where to store the results tarball') parser.add_option('-r', '--prevrel' , type='string', dest='previousrel' , metavar='' , help = 'Top level dir of previous release for regression ****ysis' ) The same code could become much more readable if there was an equivalent method of set_defaults for the description/help of the option. The same code could then become: parser.set_description( verbose = 'Output less information', castordir = 'specify the wanted CASTOR directory where to store the results tarball', previousrel = 'Top level dir of previous release for regression ****ysis') parser.add_option('-q', '--quiet' , action="store_false", dest='verbose') parser.add_option('-o', '--output' , type='string', dest='castordir' , metavar='' ) parser.add_option('-r', '--prevrel' , type='string', dest='previousrel' , metavar='' ) Help descriptions can often be quite long and separating them in this fashion would, IMHO, be deable. Kind
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Saturday 3rd November 2012
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proposal: give delattr ability to ignore missing attribute

I would like to propose that functionality be added to delattr to handle the case when the attribute does not exist. First off, getattr handles this nicely with the default parameter: value = getattr(obj, 'foo', False) instead of: try: value = getattr(obj, 'foo') except AttributeError: value = False or: if hasattr(obj, 'foo'): value = getattr(obj, 'foo') else: value = False And I think it makes sense to have something similar for delattr (name the argument as you wish): delattr(obj, 'foo', allow_missing=True) instead of: try: delattr(obj, 'foo') except AttributeError: pass or: try: del obj.foo except AttributeError: pass or: if hasattr(obj, 'foo') delattr(obj, 'foo') For backwards compatibility, allow_missing would default to False. Gary
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327

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Saturday 3rd November 2012
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del and sets proposal

You can do the following: a = [1,2,3,4,5] del a[0] and a = {1:'1', 2: '2', 3: '3', 4:'4', 5:'5'} del a[1] why doesn't it work the same for sets (particularly since sets are based on a dictionary) a = set([1,2,3,4,5]) del a[1] Yes I know that sets have a remove method (like lists), but since dictionaries don't have a remove method, shouldn't sets behave like more like dictionaries and less like lists IMHO del for sets is quite intuitive. I guess it is too late to change now. -Larry
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Sunday 4th November 2012
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proposal, change self. to .

Am 03.08.2008, 12:51 Uhr, schrieb Equand : > how about changing the precious self. to . > imagine > > self.update() > > .update() > > simple right What about: class x: def x(self,ob): ob.doSomethingWith(self) Not so simple anymore, isn't it If you're not trolling, there's hundreds of reasons why the explicit self is as it is, and it's not going to go away, just as a thread that produced immense amounts of response demonstrated around a week ago. Read that, and rethink. --- Heiko.
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feature proposal, debug on exception

There's an occasional question here about how to get python to launch pdb on encountering an uncaught exception. The answer is to look in some ASPN recipe and do some weird magic. I guess that works, but it's another thing to remember or keep looking up when the occasion arises (some program crashes unexpectedly). I find myself manually adding tracing instead, finding out that I did it wrong and having to re-launch a long-running program, etc. I'd like to propose that debug-on-exception be made into a standard feature that is easy to enable, e.g. with a command line option or with a simple pdb call immediately after the import: import pdb pdb.debug_on_exception(True) ... Would there be big obstacles to this It would have saved me considerable hassle on a number of occasions. I'm constantly processing large data sets that will munch along happily for hours and hours before hitting some unanticipated condition in the data, and it would be great to trap immediately rather than have to ****yze the resulting stack dump and restart. , On May 21, 10:59 am, Paul Rubin wrote: > I'd like to propose that debug-on-exception be made into a standard > feature that is easy to enable, e.g. with a command line option > or with a simple pdb call immediately after the import: Forgive me if I've missed your point, but it seems you can already do this: pdb.py can also be invoked as a script to debug other scripts. For example: python -m pdb myscript.py When invoked as a script, pdb will automatically enter post-mortem debugging if the program being debugged exits abnormally. After post-mortem debugging (or after normal exit of the program), pdb will restart the program. Automatic restarting preserves pdb's state (such as breakpoints) and in most cases is more useful than quitting the debugger upon program's exit. New in version 2.4: Restarting post-mortem behavior added. http://docs.python.org/lib/module-pdb.html
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pycon matplotlib tutorial deadline tomorrow

I will be presenting a tutorial on matplotlib a this year's pycon. If you are coming to the conference, are are already in the Chicago area, you may want to consider signing up for the tutorial http://us.pycon.org/2008/tutorials/ Tomorrow (Monday Feb 18th) is the deadline for registration. Here are some snippets from the proposal which covers the topic list and some additional info: = Intended audience = Tutorial attendees should be familiar with the basics of python and numpy. = Format description = The tutorial is a 20-30 minute overview of matplotlib capabilities, where the presenter will work interactively while explaining the main features and capabilities of matplotlib. After that, the rest of the tutorial will be interactive, hands on, exercises, that are will be a mix of "type-along" tutorial with students working through examples with help from the instructor. = Promotional summary = Matplotlib is a python 2D plotting library which produces publication quality figures in a variety of hardcopy formats and interactive environments across platforms. matplotlib can be used in python scripts, the python and ipython shell (ala matlab or mathematica), web application servers, and six graphical user interface toolkits. The tutorial will cover basic plotting from the python shell, and advanced topics like object oriented matplotlib, using matplotlib in a user interface or web application server and interactive event handling. = Tutorial outline = * 30 min: overview of capabilities and type along * 30 min: interactive graphics from the python shell * 30 min: object oriented matplotlib, web application servers and embedding matplotlib in GTK, Qt, Tk, FLTK or WX * 30 min: user interaction and event handling in matplotlib * 30 min: advanced topics * 30 min: question and answer = Presenter = The presenter is the original author and lea developer of matplotlib. After many years in academia, where he developed scientific python software for human intracortical epilepsy recording, he recently departed the confines of academia for the financial industry, where he continues to develop python based solutions for data ****ysis, modeling and visualization. = Previous presentations and tutorials = * SciPy 2004-6 : matplotlib presentations * PyCon 2005 : matplotlib presentation * SciPy 2006 : led tutorial on data ****sysis and visualization with Fernando Perez * ChiPy : matplotlib presentation to the Chicago Python User's Group * UIC : scientific computing in python tutorial at Univ of Illinois Chicago * Py4Science : with Fernando Perez, teach 2 day seminar on scientific computing in python. Sessions at Los Alamos, UC Berkeley, Univ of Michigan, Claremont Colleges Hope to see you there! Let me know if you have any questions or topic requests JDH
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Alternate indent proposal for python 3000

I was considering putting together a proposal for an alternate block syntax for python, and I figured I'd post it here and see what the general reactions are. I did some searching, and while I found a lot of tab vs space debates, I didn't see anything like what I'm thinking of, so forgive me if this is a very dead horse. Generally speaking, I like the current block scheme just fine. I use python on a daily basis for system administration and text parsing tasks, and it works great for me. From time to time, though, I find myself needing a language for server- side includes in web pages. Because of the need to indent (and terminate indents), python seems an awkward choice for this, and it's easy for me to see why php and perl are more popular choices for this kind of task. Perhaps this is just my perception though. I feel that including some optional means to block code would be a big step in getting wider adoption of the language in web development and in general. I do understand though, that the current strict indenting is part of the core of the language, so... thoughts
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A proposal for attribute lookup failures

Proposal: When an attribute lookup fails for an object, check the top-level (and local scope) for a corresponding function or attribute and apply it as the called attribute if found, drop through to the exception otherwise. This is just syntactic sugar. Example: a = [1,2,3] a.len() # -> fails, # -> finds len() in the top-level symbol table, # -> applies len(a) # -> 3 a.foobar() # -> fails, # -> no foobar() in scope, # -> raise NameError Benefits: - Uniform OO style. Top-levels can be hidden as attributes of data. Most of the top-level functions / constructors can be considered as attributes of the data; e.g., an int() representation of a string can be considered as _part_ of the semantics of the string (i.e., one _meaning_ of the string is an int representation); but doing it this way saves from storing the int (etc) data as part of the actual object. The trade-off is speed for space. - Ability to "add" attributes to built-in types (which is requested all the time!!) without having to sub-class a built-in type and initialize all instances as the sub-class. E.g., one can simply define flub() in the top-level (local) namespace, and then use "blah".flub() as if the built-in str class provided flub(). - Backwards compatible; one can use the top-level functions when deed. No change to existing code required. - Seemingly trivial to implement (though I don't know much C). On attribute lookup failure, simply iterate the symbol table looking for a match, otherwise raise the exception (like current implementation). Drawbacks: - Could hide the fact that an extra (On) lookup on the symbol table is necessary for attribute lookup failure. (Maybe there could be a switch/pragma to enable (or disable) the functionality) - As above, attribute lookup failure requires an extra lookup on the symbol table, when normally it would fall through directly to exception. - \t Disclaimer: I realize that very often what seems good to me, ends up being half- assed, backwards and generally bad. So I'd appreciate input on this proposition. Don't take it that I think the idea is wonderful and am trying to push it. I am just throwing it out there to see what may become of it.
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RE: sorteddict PEP proposal [started off as orderedict]

> From: Paul Hankin > > > Here's a first go. Sorting occurs when the keys are iterated over, > making it fast (almost as a dict) for construction, insertion, and > deletion, but slow if you're iterating a lot. You should look at some > use cases to decide if this approach is best, or if a sorted > datastructure should be used instead, but my instinct is that this is > a decent approach. Certainly, you're unlikely to get a simpler > implementation > > class sorteddict(dict): > "A sorted dictionary" > def __init__(self, arg=None, cmp=None, key=None, reverse=False): > if arg: > super(sorteddict, self).__init__(arg) > else: > super(sorteddict, self).__init__() > self._cmp = cmp > self._key = key > self._reverse = reverse > def keys(self): > return sorted(super(sorteddict, self).keys(), cmp=self._cmp, > key=self._key, reverse=self._reverse) > def iter_keys(self): > return (s for s in self.keys()) > def items(self): > return [(key, self[key]) for key in self.keys()] > def iter_items(self): > return ((key, self[key]) for key in self.keys()) > def values(self): > return [self[key] for key in self.keys()] > def iter_values(self): > return (self[key] for key in self.keys()) > def __str__(self): > return '{' + ', '.join('%s: %s' % (repr(k), repr(v)) > for k, v in self.iter_items()) + '}' > def __repr__(self): > return str(self) > def __iter__(self): > return self.iter_keys() You could speed up keys() at the cost of memory if you maintained a list of keys in the instance. Doing so would let you use an "unsorted" flag that gets set when a new key is added and checked when keys() is called. If the flag is unset, just return a copy of the list. Otherwise, sort the list in place, return a copy, and unset the flag. (Copies because you don't want the master key list to be modified by code using the class.) The use case for this seems to be when you have a dictionary that you need to often work through in sorted order. Sorting the keys every time keys() is called isn't an improvement over using a regular dict and sorting the keys normally. So the extra memory cost of maintaining an internal keys list looks reasonable to me. -- -Bill Hamilton
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Only one week left for PyCon proposals!

There is only one week left for PyCon tutorial & scheduled talk proposals. If you've been thinking about making a proposal, now's the time! Tutorial details and instructions here: http://us.pycon.org/2008/tutorials/proposals/ Scheduled talk details and instructions here: http://us.pycon.org/2008/conference/proposals/ The deadline is Friday, November 16. Don't put it off any longer! PyCon 2008: http://us.pycon.org -- David Goodger PyCon 2008 Chair -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.0 (Darwin) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org iD8DBQFHNSxarqIPjB1FxosRA3jCAJ92ns7uhdthR/Mo2NtNCYYlecRXyACffNrP Q9eUyWT4iqW3R4JbYc9Ab6w= =XcuL -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
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APL2007 reminder: early (cheaper) registration ends Thursday 9/13

On-line registration is through the OOPSLA registrar http://www.regmaster.com/conf/oopsla2007.html APL 2007 home page http://www.sigapl.org/apl2007.html
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Re: [pyconuk] pyweek is happening august 02 - august 09

, On 04/08/07, Laura Creighton wrote: > 00:00 UTC 2007-09-02 to 00:00 UTC 2007-09-09 exactly. See > www.pyweek.org > > PyconUK is happening. http://www.pyconuk.org/ 8th and 9th September. > > This means that those of us who generally do not see each other but are > going to PyconUK could put together an entry and then sprint together > on it before PyCon UK. There would be this terrible torment -- do > I attend the con or get my game to work -- but it is still the > best chance some of us have to work together yet. > > Talk to me if you are interested in maybe making a PyconUK pygame > team. I think that this could be a lot of fun. Sign up on > www.pyweek.org if you think so, as well. But mail me. > > John -- assuming we want to meet up _before_ PyConUK -- can that > work Yes, we'd really like to see you at PyCon UK, and the games! We have sprint facilities available for two days before and two days after PyCon UK. They are at 95 Broad Street, about ten minutes walk from the Conference venue. There is a fat pipe internet connection. There are three rooms available, one has 10 high spec workstations which can be pre-installed with the o/s of your choice, for the other rooms you'd need your own laptops. There are places nearby to buy cheap food (a local supermarket and the usual fast food and sandwich shops). > Can you point us at a cheap hostel for a few days Looking at http://www.pyconuk.org/accommodation.html : The budget buys are the Etap (conference hotel) and Birmingham Backpackers, they are also furthest from the sprint location, say 25 and 30 minutes walk respectively (I haven't timed these). Basically, you can stay at either of these for less than 20 if you share. Also worth considering are the Comfort Zone serviced apartments, the ones in Townsend Street are about ten minutes walk from the sprint venue, less to the conference. The nearest hotel is the Novotel (where we're holding the conference dinner) at 70 Broad Street, 2 minutes from the sprint and 10 from the Conference. You should be able to get an online deal for about 69 for a double room. Just behind the Novotel is the Premier Travel Inn, slightly less at say 65 for a double. There are two Travel Inns in the area, sprinters would want the Birmingham Broad Street (Brindley Place) one. A good compromise between cost and convenience for the sprinters would be the Travelodge, just across the road from the sprint at 230 Broad Street, where you can get a family room (sleeps 3 adults plus one child, 4 adults at a push) for 66. One of the PyCon UK delegates has been finding cheap accommodation in the area, and I'll ask him to contact you directly, Laura. Best wishes, John --
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Vancouver Python Workshop - Talk submission deadline

What's New =========== This is your last change to submit a talk for the Vancouver Python Workshop. Talks will be accepted until Friday June 16th. This is a great opportunity for you to share your project or interests with the Python community, so please take advantage of it! To submit a talk, see: http://www.vanpyz.org/conference/talksubmission.html About the Vancouver Python Workshop =================================== The conference will begin with keynote addresses on August 4st by Guido van Rossum [1], Jim Hugunin [2], and Ian Cavn [3]. Further talks (and tutorials for beginners) will take place on August 5th and 6th. The Vancouver Python Workshop is a community organized and designed for both the beginner and for the experienced Python programmer with: * tutorials for beginning programmers * advanced lectures for Python experts * case studies of Python in action * after-hours social events * informative keynote speakers * tracks on multimedia, Web development, education and more More information see: http://www.vanpyz.org/conference/ or contact Brian Quinlan at: brian@sweetapp.com Vancouver ========= In addition to the opportunity to learn and socialize with fellow Pythonistas, the Vancouver Python Workshop also gives visitors the opportunity to visit one of the most extraordinary cities in the world [4]. For more information about traveling to Vancouver, see: http://www.vanpyz.org/conference/vancouver.html http://www.tourismvancouver.com http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver Important dates =============== Talk proposals accepted: May 15th to June 15th Early registration (discounted): May 22nd to June 30th Normal registration: from July 1st Keynotes: August 4th Conference and tutorial dates: August 5th and 6th [1] Guido van Rossum (Google) is the inventor of Python and has managed its growth and development for more than a decade. Guido was awarded the Free Software Foundation Award in 2002 and Dr.Dobb's 1999 Excellence in Programming Award. Guido works at Google and spends half of his time on Python. [2] Jim Hugunin (Microsoft) is the creator of numerous innovations that take Python into new application domains. Jim's most recent project, IronPython integrates Python into Microsoft's .NET runtime. Jim's previous project, Jython is Python for the Java runtime and was the second production-quality implementation of Python. Before that, Jim's Numeric Python adapted Python to the needs of number crunching applications. Jim works at Microsoft adapting the .NET runtime to the needs of dynamic languages like Python. [3] Ian Cavn is the primary developer of the Lowry Digital Images motion picture restoration system. This Python and Zope-based system has been used to restore over 150 motion pictures. Highlights include Citizen Kane, Sunset Boulevard and both the Indiana Jones and Star Wars trilogies. While Ian was Chief Scientist at Lowry Digital, his rack of computers grew from a few Macintoshes on his desktop to over six hundred Macintosh and Linux servers - at one point earning Lowry the title as the second biggest installation of parallel processing Maintoshes in the world. In 2005, Lowry Digital Images was acquired by DTS (the famous movie audio company) and renamed DTS Digital Images. The motion picture restoration system has been discussed in publications as diverse as IEEE Spectrum, USA Today, the BBC NEWS, the New York Times and Apple.com. Ian has been a Python enthusiast since 1999. [4] http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2299119.stm Cheers, Brian
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Reminder: call for proposals "Python Language and Libraries Track"for Europython 2006

Registration for Europython (3-5 July) at CERN in Geneva is now open, if you feel submitting a talk proposal there's still time until the 31th of May. If you want to talk about a library you developed, or you know well and want to share your knowledge, or about how you are making the best out of Python through inventive/elegant idioms and patterns (or if you are a language guru willing to disseminate your wisdom), you can submit a proposal for the Python Language and Libraries track """ A track about Python the Language, all batteries included. Talks about the language, language evolution, patterns and idioms, implementations (CPython, IronPython, Jython, PyPy ...) and implementation issues belong to the track. So do talks about the standard library or interesting 3rd-party libraries (and frameworks), unless the gravitational pull of other tracks is stronger. """ The full call and submission links are at: http://www.europython.org/sections/t...-for-proposals Samuele Pedroni, Python Language and Libraries Track Chair
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PyCon reminder: register now!

Remember, Monday January 15th is the last day for early-bird registration for PyCon 2007 (February 23-25, in Addison Texas). For registration, go to . If you're interested in the tutorials you should register as soon as possible. One tutorial is nearing its maximum size; when that limit is reached, registration for that tutorial will be closed. Hurry!
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Reminder: PyCon proposals due in a week

The deadline for PyCon 2006 submissions is now only a week away. If you've been procrastinating about putting your outline together, now's the time to get going... Call for Proposals: http://www.python.org/pycon/2006/cfp Proposal submission site: http://submit.python.org/ --amk
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ANN: Naja 1.0.5 is now available

Naja is a download manager and a website grabber written in Python/wxPython.You can add some plugins (newsreader, FTP client,WebDAV client) and take control of your downloads from your office. Naja supports proxy(HTTP, HTTPS, FTP, SOCKS v4a, SOCKS v5), and use some authentication methods. The downloading maybe achieved by splitting the file being downloaded into several parts and downloading these parts at the same time (HTTP, HTTPS, FTP). Donwload speeds are increased by downloading the file from the mirrors sites, when the sites propose it. Others features: Csv filter Cheksums (CRC32, MD2, MD4, MD5, SHA, SHA1, MDC2, RMD160) Crypt (Only for the eXtended version) and Decrypt (AES, DES, 3DES ...) newsreader, newsposter (uue, yEnc) CGI & WebDAV Server Web Interface basic and digest authentication for client and server Compress and decompress (zip, tar.gz, tar.bz2) Picture viewer Naja is available for download from the Keyphrene web site: http://www.keyphrene.com/products/naja
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[ANNOUNCE] Thirty-first release of PythonCAD now available

Hi. I'm pleased to announce the thirty-first development release of PythonCAD, a CAD package for open-source software users. As the name implies, PythonCAD is written entirely in Python. The goal of this project is to create a fully scriptable drafting program that will match and eventually exceed features found in commercial CAD software. PythonCAD is released under the GNU Public License (GPL). PythonCAD requires Python 2.2 or newer. The interface is GTK 2.0 based, and uses the PyGTK module for interfacing to GTK. The design of PythonCAD is built around the idea of separating the interface from the back end as much as possible. By doing this, it is hoped that both GNOME and KDE interfaces can be added to PythonCAD through usage of the appropriate Python module. Addition of other PythonCAD interfaces will depend on the availability of a Python module for that particular interface and developer interest and action. The latest release features improvements to the entity splitting code and a new split operation, automatic entity splitting. The splitting code has been rewritten which fixed several bugs while making the code simpler and clearer to understand. The new autosplitting code is a feature that, when activated, will make the program split existing entities in a drawing when a newly added point lands on the entity. Various code cleanups are also present in this release, including the ability to set and later change the default style values for the different entities used within PythonCAD. Finally, a number of bug fixes and other code improvements are present in this release. A mailing list for the development and use of PythonCAD is available. Visit the following page for information about subscribing and viewing the mailing list archive: http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/pythoncad Visit the PythonCAD web site for more information about what PythonCAD does and aims to be: http://www.pythoncad.org/ Come and join me in developing PythonCAD into a world class drafting program! Art Haas -- Man once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous, and like a ship without rudder, is the sport of every wind. -Thomas Jefferson to James Smith, 1822
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ANN: Vancouver Python Workshop - Talk deadline TODAY

This is a reminder that the deadline for submitting talks for the Vancouver Python Workshop is TODAY! We've had a lot of great talks submitted but there is still space in the schedule for more. To submit a talk, see: http://www.vanpyz.org/conference/reg...bmissions.html For general conference information, see: http://www.vanpyz.org/conference About the Vancouver Python Workshop =================================== The conference will begin on July 31st with keynote addresses by Guido van Rossum (the creator of Python) and Paul Everitt (co-founder of Zope Corp). Further talks (and tutorials for beginners) will take place on August 1st and 2nd. The conference will be roughly divided into three tracks: o Python language and applications o Content management with Python (esp. Zope and Plone) o Python for beginners More information see: http://www.vanpyz.org/conference/ or contact Brian Quinlan at: brian@sweetapp.com Vancouver ========= In addition to the opportunity to learn and socialize with fellow Pythonistas, the Vancouver Python Workshop also gives visitors the opportunity to visit one of the most extraordinary cities in the world (1). For more information about traveling to Vancouver, see: http://www.vanpyz.org/conference/travel.html http://www.tourismvancouver.com Important dates =============== Talk submissions: until June 22nd (today!) Attendee registration: June 4th to June 30th Late registration: from July 1st Keynotes, preconference sprints & tutorials: July 31st Conference and tutorial dates: August 1st and 2nd (1) http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2299119.stm http://www.mercerhr.com/pressrelease...ontent=1128760 Cheers, Brian
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