Python for CE/Pocket PC


does anyone use any of the python on their PDA i'd like to know which one of the Python CE software i shud use and whether it works properly (is it worth the bother).
Posted On: Friday 28th of December 2012 05:26:46 AM Total Views:  212
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Registering a python function in C

Could someone post an example on how to register a python function as a callback in a C function It expects a pointer to PyObject... how do I expose that Basically, the signature of the function is foo(PyObject* obj), where obj is the callback function... It's not exactly extending or embedding, I've looked at those examples but they don't really show how to do this...
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Monday 5th November 2012
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Re: Puzzled by "is"

> > Why Because. > > Seriously, it's just an optimization by the implementers. There is no > need for more than one empty tuple, since tuples can never be modified > once created. > > But they decided not to create (1, ) in advance. They probably knew that > hardly anybody would want to create that tuple ;-) [Seriously: if you > started trying to predict which tuples would be used you would go > insane, but the empty tuple is the most likely candidate]. > That's just theorisation but I'd rather expect the interpreter simply not to create a second tuple while there already is an identical one. This could save some memory if the tuple was large (Although by the same token comparison of large tuples can be expensive). Admittedly the empty tuple is a special case but then 'Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules'. A bit odd. Best regards, Greg
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Monday 5th November 2012
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Re: Python compilation ??

Evan Klitzke wrote: > On 7/2/07, Cathy Murphy wrote: >> Is python a compiler language or interpreted language. If it is interpreter >> , then why do we have to compile it > > It's an interpreted language. It is compiled into bytecode (not > machine code) the first time a script is run to speed up subsequent > executions of a script. > While the flavor of this answer is correct, in strict point of fact Python *doesn't* compile the scripts it executes, only the modules that are imported. That's why you will occasionally see a very small Python program that just calls functions imported from much larger modules. This avoids spending the time that would otherwise have to be spent recompiling a large script at each execution. regards Steve -- Steve Holden +1 571 484 6266 +1 800 494 3119 Holden Web LLC/Ltd http://www.holdenweb.com Skype: holdenweb http://del.icio.us/steve.holden --------------- Asciimercial ------------------ Get on the web: Blog, lens and tag the Internet Many services currently offer free registration ----------- Thank You for Reading -------------
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92

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Monday 5th November 2012
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Python 3 and PEP238 division

Is the PEP238 change to division going into Python 3 as planned I realise that the new integer division semantics have been available in "from __future__" for quite a few years now, but a warning might be appropriate now that Python 3 is in alpha. A lot of people have probably either forgotten, or else never knew about PEP238. The following wording is still included in the Python 2.5.1 documentation... """ 3.1.1 Numbers The interpreter acts as a simple calculator: you can type an expression at it and it will write the value. Expression syntax is straightforward: the operators +, -, * and / work just like in most other languages (for example, Pascal or C); parentheses can be used for grouping. For example: >>> 2+2 4 >>> # This is a comment .... 2+2 4 >>> 2+2 # and a comment on the same line as code 4 >>> (50-5*6)/4 5 >>> # Integer division returns the floor: .... 7/3 2 >>> 7/-3 -3 """ Which is interesting, since neither Pascal nor C division works like that. Pascal has a separate 'div' operator for integer division. C and C++ compilers usually round toward zero IIRC, but the rounding direction is not defined in the standards. In any case, after the final adoption of PEP238, integer division in Python will generally return float results - not the rounded-to-floor integer results shown here. It might be worth brainstorming some contexts where problems are likely to occur, to help anyone trying to prepare for the change. My contribution to that would be any code that needs to partition lists into slices. The obvious cases - binary searching, sorting - are covered by libraries which should be used in preference to hand- written code, but this kind of thing can happen elsewhere. I have some code that organises a sorted list of data into a balanced tree as part of a code generation task, for example, which relies on floor division. Also, if money amounts are stored as integer numbers of pennies (which they often are, since floats represent approximate values) problems could occur with various calculations since multiplication by a fractional quantity is often represented as a multiplication followed by a division. For example adding 5% is equivalent to multiplying by 1.05, or to multiplying by 105 then dividing by 100. The latter idiom is often used to keep everything integer, which requires division results to be rounded. Use of the decimal module is probably a good idea for money amounts these days, of course. I've not used it myself but the whole point of a decimal number type would be to get exact results and the kind of rounding behaviour that accountants would expect. The real world fix would normally be to replace the / operator with //, though, in order to keep the old floor-division semantics.
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50

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Wednesday 7th November 2012
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Question about pychecker and pylint

I wonder if pychecker projet is dead On pychecker home page (http://pychecker.sourceforge.net/), last version date from February 3, 2006 and their mailist contain spam messages only. Other tools like pychecker is pylint at (http://www.logilab.org/project/eid/857). This is a great tools and it's still active. However, it has issue : its web site, it is very incomprehensible. Do you have other pylint web site
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99

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Wednesday 7th November 2012
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Please donate to the Python Software Foundation

I'm writing to urge members of the Python community to please keep the Python Software Foundation in mind in your "year end giving". The PSF is the 501(c)3 non-profit organization that holds and protects the intellectual property rights behind Python. We deal with the licensing, contribution agreements, and legal requirements of copyright and trademark in order to keep Python open and free of legal claims. The PSF also: * Provides the financial backing that makes PyCon possible: http://us.pycon.org/ * Funds special projects such as the recent website redesign: http://python.org/ and the current Python Advocacy Coordinator experiment: http://python.org/psf/grants/advocacy/orig-proposal.pdf http://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonAdvocacyCoordinator * Funds grants: http://www.python.org/psf/grants/ * Responds to legal queries about the license, trademarks, or US export control registration, owns/renews the key Python domain names, and other such administrative chores. How to Donate ------------- We take credit cards, checks, wire transfers, and PayPal: http://www.python.org/psf/donations/ Donations are tax deductible for US citizens and for any business where donations or sponsorship can be considered pre-tax business expenses. Businesses can also consider becoming a sponsor member of the PSF: http://www.python.org/psf/sponsorship/ Or, become a sponsor of PyCon 2007: http://us.pycon.org/TX2007/HowToSponsor If you have any questions, please email me directly.
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Wednesday 7th November 2012
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Roundup Issue Tracker release 0.8.3

Roundup is a simple-to-use and -install issue-tracking system with command-line, web and e-mail interfaces. It is based on the winning design from Ka-Ping Yee in the Software Carpentry "Track" design competition. This 0.8.3 release adds one feature and fixes some bugs: Feature: - chinese translation by limodou Fixed: - fix reference to The Zope Book in Roundup FAQ - disabled file logging in Roundup test suite (sf bug 1155649) - return original string if message issue xref isn't valid - fix nosyreaction.py to stop it setting the nosy list unnecessarily (see doc/upgrading.txt for how to fix in your trackers) - after logout, always display tracker home page - web forms don't create new items if no item properties are set from UI - item creation failed if multilink fields had invalid entries (sf bug 1177602) - fix bdist_rpm (sf bug 1164328) - fix checking of "Email Access" for Anonymous email registration (sf bug 1177057) - disable "Email Access" for Anonymous by default to stop spam regsitering users on public trackers - send errors in the web interface to a logfile by default. Use the "debug" multiprocess mode (roundup-server) or the DEBUG_TO_CLIENT var (roundup.cgi) to have the errors appear in your browser - fix setgid typo (sf bug 1171346) - fix faulty find_template filename facility (sf bug 1163629) - fix roundup-admin "export" so it creates the target dir if needed - "fix" roundup-admin "import" to not use "universal newline support" since the csv module appears to have its own ideas about such things (sf bug 1163890) - fix installation docs referring to old-style configuration variables If you're upgrading from an older version of Roundup you *must* follow the "Software Upgrade" guidelines given in the maintenance documentation. Roundup requires python 2.3 or later for correct operation. To give Roundup a try, just download (see below), unpack and run:: python demo.py Source and documentation is available at the website: http://roundup.sourceforge.net/ Release Info (via download page): http://sourceforge.net/projects/roundup Mailing lists - the place to ask questions: http://sourceforge.net/mail/group_id=31577 About Roundup ============= Roundup manages a number of issues (with flexible properties such as "description", "priority", and so on) and provides the ability to: (a) submit new issues, (b) find and edit existing issues, and (c) discuss issues with other participants. The system will facilitate communication among the participants by managing discussions and notifying interested parties when issues are edited. One of the major design goals for Roundup that it be simple to get going. Roundup is therefore usable "out of the box" with any python 2.3+ installation. It doesn't even need to be "installed" to be operational, though a disutils-based install script is provided. It comes with two issue tracker templates (a classic bug/feature tracker and a minimal skeleton) and five database back-ends (anydbm, sqlite, metakit, mysql and postgresql).
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62

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Wednesday 7th November 2012
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id functions of ints, floats and strings

Hi all, I've been playing around with the identity function id() for different types of objects, and I think I understand its behaviour when it comes to objects like lists and tuples in which case an assignment r2 = r1 ...
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66

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Saturday 10th November 2012
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Re: Tkinter fonts setting

En Wed, 06 Feb 2008 14:02:35 -0200, Unnamed One escribi: > jim-on-linux wrote: >> On Tuesday 05 February 2008 15:22, Unnamed >> One wrote: >> >>> First question - is it possible to set >>> font to default OS ...
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105

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Saturday 10th November 2012
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grin 1.1

grin is a new grep-like tool for recursively searching through text files, primarily source code. Download: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/grin Wiki: https://svn.enthought.com/enthought/wiki/Grin SVN: https://svn.enthought.com/svn/sandbox/grin/trunk Basically, it does exactly what I want grep to do 99% of the time with the least amount of ...
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111

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Sunday 11th November 2012
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Decimals in python

. New to using Python. Python automatically round off watver i calculate using the floor function. How wud i make the exact value appear Tried out fabs() in the math library but still confused. Cud some1 elaborate on it....
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115

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Sunday 11th November 2012
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Python modules - how to create & which are better

I have embedded Python in my C++ application & creating Python function from the expression. I am then evaluating those Python compiled function (byte code) using PyObject_CallObject. I want to create a Python module which will have functions called by ...
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120

Posted on:

Monday 12th November 2012
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